Seven Things You Should Know About Pain Science

Created: 04/13/17 01:45:57PM by michael-ellner

Last Update: 08/06/17 09:36:57AM by roylehypnotist
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Michael Ellner
@michael-ellner

04/13/17 01:45:57PM

5,814 posts

FYI — Seven Things You Should Know About Pain Science 

https://www.bettermovement.org/blog/2010/seven-things-you-should-know-about-pain-science

updated by @michael-ellner: 09/09/17 04:58:27AM

Simon Tebbenham
@simon-tebbenham

04/14/17 03:02:13AM

392 posts

Can't normally be bothered to click on links that take me away from the site - but this one was worth clicking, nicely summed up. I specifically like title no.2 - pain is an output of the brain, not an input from the body. 

Adam Kilgore
@adam-kilgore

04/15/17 09:11:15AM

555 posts

Simon Tebbenham:
Can't normally be bothered to click on links that take me away from the site - but this one was worth clicking, nicely summed up. I specifically like title no.2 - pain is an output of the brain, not an input from the body. 

 
I hate external links too but Ellner doesn't fuck around.

John Cleesattel
@john-cleesattel

04/15/17 08:57:17PM

3,176 posts

Every feeling and sensation is an output from the brain, not just pain.

Think about it... why would pain be different from any other sensations we experience?

They are all provided to us for understanding of what is going on.

Surprise/confusion is literally "I don't know how to react." i.e. what to do... which is why we will automatically follow suggestions given to us at that time... because our mind has no other reaction prepared.

updated by @john-cleesattel: 04/15/17 09:00:21PM

Tyrian
@tyrian

04/19/17 03:05:27PM

3 posts

  Liked this, especially the one nr 5.  So surprise surprise, you can train pain like everything else, anybody have good suggestions on how to safely un-train pain in general?  Feeling pain easily sounds like the suckiest skill ever :/

Melissa J. Roth
@melissa-j-roth

04/28/17 06:43:18PM

674 posts

A few of us have good programs in re-training people's perceptions to not experience pain and suffering. Me, Michael Ellner, Scott Sandland, Dan Cleary, John Butler. Everybody has a different approach but they all work. I would suggest you study as many different approaches as you can find.

Simon Tebbenham
@simon-tebbenham

05/05/17 04:25:27PM

392 posts

I get the pain output/input thing. Just wondering how far you can push that post-hypnotically? You can hypnotise any chicken-clucker to sit in a bath of ice, for example... how far does that type of extremity hit every day reality?

Mark21
@mark21

05/09/17 03:51:18PM

7 posts

I really enjoyed reading this... and it is a great share Michael. Thank you!

Roy Hunter
@roy-hunter

05/09/17 06:10:23PM

1,717 posts

Melissa J. Roth:
A few of us have good programs in re-training people's perceptions to not experience pain and suffering. Me, Michael Ellner, Scott Sandland, Dan Cleary, John Butler. Everybody has a different approach but they all work. I would suggest you study as many different approaches as you can find.

Bruce Eimer also has a good approach, proven by the test of time. He is a pain psychologist at a major hospital in the Philadelphia area, and incorporates hypnosis with chronic pain patients. Note he is presenting a two-day preconference workshop at Hypnothoughts Live this August, and has asked me to be a co-presenter because I have managed chronic pain with self-hypnosis since a 1981 back injury.

Jan Krüger
@jan-krger

05/12/17 03:10:04PM

358 posts

I discovered a few things about a large class of pain that I thought might be interesting to some of you.

A few years ago I started feeling pain in my left hip area. There wasn't really any clear cause, essentially I woke up with it and it got worse over time. Walking was painful, standing was painful. It felt like the joint wasn't working quite right and I was convinced there had to be something physically wrong with the bones or something. A few visits to the doctor produced a bunch of prescriptions that essentially did nothing.

With not much else to do, I started looking into explanations. A physical therapist encouraged me to do some stretching exercises. Those were devilishly painful, but without any clear benefit. A chiropractor was quick to trace it to an alleged dysfunction of the sacroiliac joint. While looking further into stretching, quite by coincidence, I found a well-researched post on how little measurable benefit there actually is to stretching, and there was a link to an article about muscle pain. My pain seemed too "big" for it to possibly be caused by muscles... but then I found that muscle pain can refer to large areas of the body and produce anything from blurry vision and toothaches to pain patterns commonly associated with heart attacks. That did sound relevant.

There has been some scientific support for a theory of trigger points (hyperirritable spots in muscles that can cause weakness and pain), though many of the details are essentially guesswork at this point (one thing most people agree on is that trigger points exist, so that's something) and there's, at best, tentative support for the effectiveness of various treatments. Let's read between the lines here, though.

According to one theory, trigger points happen at motor endplates (where a nerve meets the muscle and provides biochemical stimulation). So, presumably trigger points are the result of a "mistake" in the nervous system. Typical explanations of why trigger points stick around are on a biochemical level: a chemical vicious circle in which the motor endplate keeps stimulating the muscle because of an overabundance of activating/depolarizing substances (notably acetylcholine). Treatments usually aim to improve blood circulation in the area to restore normal operation, usually by applying a suitable amount of pressure (massage).

It seems to me like a combination approach might be valuable: making people aware of these trigger points so they can be tackled physically, but also tracing back possible causes (learned responses but also muscle overuse, particularly eccentric contraction (muscle contraction while stretched) seems to be a risk factor for trigger points) and getting rid of them. Even given the purely physical intervention, it seems to me like, to some extent, massaging a muscle can be a kind of pointed suggestion, too, a direct conversation with the nervous system, if you like...

Of course this isn't relevant to all types of pain, but ever since I became aware of trigger points, I've had a much easier time managing back pain, headaches and a number of other annoyances... and my hip eventually went back to perfectly fine, after a week or two of massaging the gluteus minimus/medius muscles and some of the other nearby muscles.

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