Forum Activity for @Tim Shay

Tim Shay
@Tim Shay
10/06/17 07:59:22AM
47 posts
Stephen Brooks

FWIW: I've read much of his blog and seen quite a bit of his content going back to about 2004.   He knows his stuff. Very Ericksonian in approach. He also is well versed in NLP as well. 

Tim Shay
@Tim Shay
10/06/17 07:56:53AM
47 posts
Scott Jansen

I've taken some time and reviewed a few of his videos.  It seems likely that he is a student of Igor L's.  Much of what I have heard is repackaged content.  If you like Igor then you'd like Scott Jansen.  I stand by my statement that he is knowledgeable.  I have saved his page on youtube and I will be curious to see if he offers more original content in the future. 

 

Best,

Tim

Tim Shay
@Tim Shay
10/04/17 07:23:42PM
47 posts
The BEST Way to Word Hypnotic Inductions and Suggestions

Very interesting, Don. Thank you for sharing!! While I am familiar with the book, it has been a while :-) 

If you'd be interested in looking into some of the more current research (not that there's anything wrong with the Pibram and Galanter from '56), there's an author Dr, Michael Domjan who has continued carrying the baton in the Cognitive Psychology field.  There's also some really intriguing findings regarding memory from the field of Affective Psychology as well.

A couple of good articles as well:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170817122149.htm  (they found a recalling a memory requires a “detour” circuit that branches off from the original memory circuit)

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160517131928.htm ( a good explanation of the most current info we have on memory from Texas A&M University)

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-art-and-science-aging-well/201611/specific-ways-improve-your-memory  Dr. Williams has a brief mention about the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. 

And here's a pretty good Spark Notes on Enhancing Memory: http://www.sparknotes.com/psychology/psych101/memory/section4.rhtml

At any rate, as I said. I am a fan of learning and retaining what I have learned. 

Best,

Tim

Tim Shay
@Tim Shay
10/02/17 07:29:48PM
47 posts
The BEST Way to Word Hypnotic Inductions and Suggestions

I suppose that may depend on what a person is using it for, Don? Aren't there a few theories about the ways that memories are a stored and retrieved and the length of time one can access those memories? I am sure that I don't know enough about the neurology or psychobiology of the brain, but perhaps there are other factors involved?  I am really curious about the capacity of a person being able to remember great volumes of information. It has been a fascination for many for as long as I can... well... remember :-) LOL 

Tim Shay
@Tim Shay
09/28/17 06:01:13AM
47 posts
The BEST Way to Word Hypnotic Inductions and Suggestions

I will take any form of compliance (social or otherwise) as a doorway into deeper compliance. Utilization!!

 

Tim Shay
@Tim Shay
09/28/17 05:27:59AM
47 posts
What has happened?

I am wondering if there's a reason why the Hypno Gods have drawn this new interest in Hypnothoughts :-)

Tim Shay
@Tim Shay
09/24/17 10:39:41AM
47 posts
Scott Jansen

I am just starting to review some of his materials. He seems knowledgeable. 

Tim Shay
@Tim Shay
02/21/14 10:29:03AM
47 posts
How to form suggestions off the top of your head?


Well said!


Barry Neale said:

Hi,

When designing a therapy session (or even a new technique) it is a good idea to follow this framework.

It is called the meta pattern of all change patterns and come from modelling the successful change patterns in NLP and elsewhere.

The steps are as follows

1. Associate client to the problem. This is often a step that is missed out by so many therapists. To be really effective you should always have the client experience at least a little bit of the feeling of the problem. Current neurological research shows that this is far more important than many realised because as the client accesses the memory/feeling the appropriate areas of the brain are activated and the chemicals that are associated with it are also released. (Ruden 2011)

2. Dissociate the client from the problem.

3. Associate the client to the resources

4. Associate the resources to the problem

5. Associate the resources to the future.

Pretty much every effective therapy follows this process and it provides the perfect road map for coming up with suggestions or techniques on the fly.

To me, knowing this is far more useful than reading a bunch of scripts without knowing what is the underlying process that makes them work.

If you know the underlying process then you can create your own scripts, techniques and processes easily.

If you add in a good dose of sensory acuity you can know exactly where you are in the process and when you are done.

regards

Barry

Tim Shay
@Tim Shay
04/23/12 07:10:48PM
47 posts
Fractionation - a quick pointer

Great discussion. Thanks for the tips/reminders!

Tim Shay
@Tim Shay
04/15/12 07:05:49PM
47 posts
Smoking/Tobacco Cessation Fees

I agree with Richard's model. I am changing my practice to reflect this pricing model, as a matter of fact.


Richard Nongard - NLPBoard.com said:

Damn autocorrect on my cellphone.... Now I'm on the real computer.

I meant to type: When one is selling solutions rather than trading dollars for hours, these difference become moot.

The idea here is that you create products, and sell those for a fixed fee, rather than a number of sessions or even the length of the session. Just like other products in a store, some are more expensive than others.