Forum Activity for @John Hall2

John Hall2
@John Hall2
09/15/17 09:23:04AM
63 posts
Ideomotor Typing (Modern Autowriting)
Simon Tebbenham:
Don't forget of course... Lapsus mamillis infectum

Youse guys.

John Hall2
@John Hall2
09/15/17 09:06:23AM
63 posts
Ideomotor Typing (Modern Autowriting)

@fable-goodman, thank you for that. This is a term I had never come across.

According to: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lapsus

The example I explained would likely fall in what they call.


  • Phrasal slips of tongue - "I'll explain this tornado later."

Only while typing.

John Hall2
@John Hall2
09/10/17 04:53:11PM
63 posts
Ideomotor Typing (Modern Autowriting)

You never know lol.

To be honest, I am actually surprised no one else has experienced this. Maybe over time more eyes will find this post. 

John Hall2
@John Hall2
09/09/17 03:46:57PM
63 posts
Ideomotor Typing (Modern Autowriting)

@init I don't have a good example right now as it's been a while since it's happened but it may looking something like:

 

"Throughout history, man snow had only one thing on his mind"

the obvious word here is snow and has nothing to do with the sentence and sounds nothing like "has". It's unrelated and just there. My fingers are doing it for me.

Further clarification, this was a fake example, but if it were real, the word snow would not have been even remotely on my mind at the time and I wouldn't have known why or that I typed it until I looked.

John Hall2
@John Hall2
09/09/17 01:31:26PM
63 posts
Ideomotor Typing (Modern Autowriting)

Hi there,
   On occasion I'll be typing out long paragraphs and distracted or zoned out to where it's almost like my fingers are typing on their own. There is nothing unusual about this, I think most typists can get in a flow where it feels like this.  What I find interesting is every so often I'll look back and find a single word in the middle of a sentence that not only doesn't fit or match, but is also a word that I wasn't even consciously thinking of.

Previously, I wouldn't think anything of it and laugh, but it has me contemplating if this could be considered a natural form of ideomotor movement (or another ideo word)?

*IF* that is the case, this is likely an fairly unexplored area. 

Has anyone noticed this before? Used it on purpose? Any insights?

John Hall2
@John Hall2
06/12/17 03:27:49PM
63 posts
Question on Mesmerism

Anesthesia to be more exact.

John Hall2
@John Hall2
06/12/17 03:27:25PM
63 posts
Question on Mesmerism

Analgesia without suggestion. No. If you can do it, mad props!

John Hall2
@John Hall2
06/12/17 02:31:19PM
63 posts
Question on Mesmerism

This link is relevant to the eye gaze.

I am far from an expert or even a mesmerist, but I have read a lot of historical books on the subject. There does seem to be *something*
to it. Something more than just a name change from mesmerism to hypnosis.

Braid himself admitted in the Neurypnology book that he was unable to produce what the mesermists did. However, his incites and methods were able to produce a trance state much much quicker and able to reproduce probably 90% of what the mesmerists did, so why not take the more efficient approach?

There were in fact 3 commissions done (4 technically), all of which had publicly vocal deniers of Mesmerism before any tests even took place. Hardly scientific in that regard. None of the commissions proved memerism didn't work or didn't exist. They got caught up in a technicality as to WHY it worked. This was enough to discredit him and ruin his life. There was no doubt his ego was larger than his britches though. That did not help his case.

One of Mesmers prodigy's (Marquis de Puysegur) realized early on that the mesmeric crisis wasn't actually necessary. So, when he performed mesmerism and taught it himself, he avoided the crisis altogether.

There were mesmeric journals just as we have hypnosis journals today of doctors documenting amazing feats such as healing a breast cancer, blindness, skin conditions, and other examples.

The phenomena's of mesmerism included anesthesia without suggestion as Esdaile carried out. Many of his patients took 10+ hours to reach somnambulism and he had nurses or otherwise hired help to carry out the hand passes and over the course of days to a week before he would administer a surgery.

Another phenomena documented was telepathy or thought transference. It is really easy to throw this out as hokem, but this was a very common phenomena also mentioned in older hypnosis books, but only when the subject was in a sufficiently deep state and not everyone could accomplish it.

Why then do you not see such phenomena today? For one, belief systems of the hypnosis practitioners, no practicality other than a parlor trick, and frankly I do not believe most of the hypnosis that we see today are getting the subjects in a deep enough state to accomplish it.

I don't fully have all the dots connected yet, but there does seem to be a trade off of time/speed with the depth of the subject. They spent hours and days with the passes until it worked in extreme cases.

The other answer is, we do see such phenomena today, but only in deeper trance levels such as Ultra Depth. James Ramey was on a Cal Banyan podcast a few years ago and told of simply thinking of a suggestion and the subject began to respond aloud to what his thoughts were saying.

Ines Simpson of the Simpson protocol also had a similar story to Ramey. I forget the specifics.

Gerry Kein had a podcast where he spoke of a woman who was guided into viewing the inside of another woman's body hypnotically and saw an undiagnosed cancer in the other womans body that was later proven true (I likely screwed up this story, but it was something along these lines). I do not remember at this point if he had the woman in a deep hypnosis or Ultra Height.

I do not have all the answers, just sharing tidbits I have come across. I am also aware that you can intentionally use passes as a hypnotic induction, however I am unaware of any one who can produce anesthesia without suggestion in what is commonly referred to as "hypnosis" without going into Esdaile or some other state distince from vanilla hypnosis.

 

I know I'm going to catch a lot of heat on this post. Just sharing observations. Try to be nice :)

John Hall2
@John Hall2
05/18/17 04:34:02PM
63 posts
A Hypnotists View of Depression

I believe Irina's just giving a "frame" delivered to the subject. I get your point, but I didn't interpret any of what she said as "bullying". It's a different paradigm than some, but if she is specializing in it and helping people, then I say more power to her. Re: inhabiting different universes. Let's blame Mandela :)