Anxiety Caused by Medication

Created: 08/02/17 05:50:36PM by thomas-houle

Last Update: 08/09/17 03:02:26PM by Chev
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Thomas Houle
@thomas-houle

08/02/17 05:50:36PM

94 posts

Have a client coming in with Anxiety caused by medication. He took Prednisone for cancer treatment has been off of it for over a year but still suffers from Anxiety from the time he wakes up till he goes to bed. He is seeing a talk therapist who has him doing breathing exercises, calming music, journaling which has reduced it but has not eliminated. He is retired, has a great family and no reason to feel this way. He is obsessing about the anxiety. Any would be appreciated.

updated by @thomas-houle: 08/12/17 04:37:18AM

John Cleesattel
@john-cleesattel

08/02/17 08:43:29PM

3,169 posts

I would suggest a managers meeting to inform the part that is causing the anxiety that the medicine is no longer being taken so there is no need for the side effect.

Thomas Houle
@thomas-houle

08/03/17 08:18:00AM

94 posts

Thanks John,

I purchased your protocol several years ago and will review prior to the session. Anything else you would recommend that I look out for? 

Kelley Woods
@kelley-woods

08/03/17 08:47:24AM

3,104 posts

There are so many ways to help someone quell unwelcome feelings and sensations but one of the best things we can do is to help them change the meaning they place on them. Michael Ellner told a story once about a man who came to him, fraught over his panic attacks. Michael asked him to describe how that felt, having a panic attack, and the guy explained how he couldn't catch his breath, his pulse rate went up, he broke out sweating and couldn't think straight! It was very frightening to this man.

Michael tells that he looked at his client and said, "Hey, sounds like an orgasm to me!"

Now, I have shared that story with many a client and remember it myself if ever I am struggling with some fearful or painful experience. While we don't always have to be that provocative, it's easy to enlighten a client to the idea that the nervous system is always responding to life and then help them get a handle on their own abilities to reframe how it feels and even start to self regulate those responses.

John Cleesattel
@john-cleesattel

08/03/17 09:55:37AM

3,169 posts

Thomas Houle:
Thanks John, I purchased your protocol several years ago and will review prior to the session. Anything else you would recommend that I look out for? 

In most cases, what makes the anxiety or actual panic attack bad for them is them not knowing what is happening to them, other than they are in extreme distress with no apparent cause.
Their heart is pumping like a freight train and then the room starts spinning amplifying the fear.
When they understand what is happening, it lessens the fear.
The room spinning is caused by two things:
First and foremost, they are hyperventilating without realizing it causing a massive drop in CO2 in the body, so their body cannot process the oxygen it has.
Easily remedied by breathing into a paper/plastic bag until the room stops spinning (to re-breathe in the exhaled CO2 and restore the oxygen/carbon dioxide balance)
Second, their back gets flexed into a protective hardness by curving the shoulders forward... which strains the muscles in the shoulders and neck, which also can cause a dizzy feeling. (relaxing those muscles and holding their shoulders back will help a great deal)
Have the part(s) responsible for the anxiety reaction help calm them instead... by relaxing the back, squaring the shoulders, and slowing the breathing, while giving the feeling of confidence that everything is under control.
Future pace to make sure that the new behavior is working properly, and tune/tweak as/if necessary.
Getting proper sleep and exercise as well as cutting down on caffeine will also help prevent future occurrences.

Graham Old
@graham-old

08/03/17 10:57:08AM

2,233 posts

Thomas, if you email me at graham[at]howtodoinductions[dot]com, I'll send you a PDF of my anxiety book. It's a self-help book, but there may be some ideas/techniques in there that give you food for thought.

Daniel Oromaner, MBA, CCHt
@daniel-oromaner-mba-ccht

08/04/17 05:08:54PM

39 posts

Thomas Houle:
Have a client coming in with Anxiety caused by medication. He took Prednisone for cancer treatment has been off of it for over a year but still suffers from Anxiety from the time he wakes up till he goes to bed. He is seeing a talk therapist who has him doing breathing exercises, calming music, journaling which has reduced it but has not eliminated. He is retired, has a great family and no reason to feel this way. He is obsessing about the anxiety. Any would be appreciated.

Hi Thomas,

I don't know how extensive your intake interview is, but the first thing I would look for are signs of anxiety even before the recent incidents. Most people who have anxiety aren't aware of it. Even if they have "insomnia" they don't realize that is just anxiety at night. Half of my practice has always been anxiety patients, so I feel like I understand it very well. What was his childhood like? My guess is that it wasn't great!

Now, it is possible that his drug treatment and the cancer triggered already dormant anxiety. Anxiety doesn't come out of no where! You cannot get it from drinking bad water! ;-)   Yes, there are some drugs that may induce anxiety, and some where that could be a side effect or effect from withdrawal. None of those seem to be the case though. If it has been a year, the drug is out of his system! It is not affecting him!

Your description of how his talk therapist is treating him is sadly typical. Does someone REALLY need to get a doctorate (or equivalent) to teach someone "deep breathing techniques?" There are many good breathing techniques, but someone with a six-month certification can teach all of them! And, as your patient has reported, this is only minimally helpful. A reply above suggested exercise, and that is a tried-and-true helpful approach.

If he were in my office, I would treat him like a regular anxiety patient. Sometimes life experiences trigger mental health episodes, but they don't cause them--for example, divorce, losing a job, a home, getting married, etc. As always I like to go back to childhood and do the healing from that standpoint.

I might also suggest what I have found to be the best self-help for anxiety . . . . are you ready?
Instead of focusing on the anxiety and/or trying to talk himself out of it or reassure himself (which usually doesn't help at all) the best tool is to have him DISTRACT HIMSELF! Get his mind busy with something else--TV, video game, call someone and DON'T talk about it. Puzzles, play music, do work or some other hobby. It doesn't matter as long as it occupies his mind. He will find the anxiety RAPIDLY goes away and while it will come back at some point, there will be a very nice respite (and then he can distract himself again).

I probably one day should write a book on my anxiety treatment methods, but alas I have not done that yet.

Those are my thoughts, I hope some of it helps.

Daniel
Inner Power Hypnosis & Coaching

H.Y.P.N.O.S.I.S.
@hypnosis

08/04/17 09:56:13PM

1,011 posts

Thomas Houle:
still suffers from Anxiety...breathing exercises, calming music, journaling...has reduced it but has not eliminated.

"Excessive" uneasiness and apprehension (i.e. anxiety) is due to unresolved troubles "locked inside" that have been "subconsciously" repeating and hitting "crescendos". De-stressing with breathing and relaxation techniques is a great "bandaid", but not a "remedy". Still, there remains a "lingering" fear that something bad or unpleasant will happen.
The "magic" occurs when the "False Evidence Appearing Real" (phony story one tells himself) is "lifted" during the session work: relax, regress, reveal, release, recondition, reframe (the presenting issues) and then reinforce (with suggestions).
Hail, HYPNOSIS!

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