Ideomotor Typing (Modern Autowriting)

Created: 09/09/17 01:31:26PM by john-hall2

Last Update: 09/16/17 08:55:22PM by Brian Green
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Simon Tebbenham
@simon-tebbenham

09/15/17 03:02:12AM

392 posts

Fable Goodman:
Simon Tebbenham:What was Erickson doing writing about business accounting advice??
That's Right!

I can almost feel your excitement with that one :)

Fable Goodman
@fable-goodman

09/15/17 05:27:56AM

3,692 posts

John Hall2:
..........     this is likely an fairly unexplored area.  Has anyone noticed this before? Used it on purpose? Any insights?

 
It is an subject that has been explored extensively, since the late 1800's 
It has been known by lot's of different names.
As well as the already mentioned Parapraxis,  (a slip of the tongue or slip of the pen.)
you might also look up such terms as:
lapsus calami (literally meaning slip of the pen)
lapsus clavis: (slip of the keyboard).
Obviously Freud had a lot to say about this in his 1901 book 'the psychopathology of everyday life'.
and the subject has been explored by many other psychologists, philologists, and philosophers over the years.
 
 

updated by @fable-goodman: 09/15/17 05:28:55AM

Simon Tebbenham
@simon-tebbenham

09/15/17 05:42:39AM

392 posts

Don't forget of course... Lapsus mamillis infectum

Fable Goodman
@fable-goodman

09/15/17 06:13:13AM

3,692 posts

Simon Tebbenham:
Don't forget of course... Lapsus mamillis infectum

There's many a slip, twixt cup and lip.
 

Simon Tebbenham
@simon-tebbenham

09/15/17 06:16:13AM

392 posts

Lapsus infinitus

John Hall2
@john-hall2

09/15/17 09:06:23AM

63 posts

@fable-goodman, thank you for that. This is a term I had never come across.

According to: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lapsus

The example I explained would likely fall in what they call.

  • Phrasal slips of tongue - "I'll explain this tornado later."

Only while typing.

John Hall2
@john-hall2

09/15/17 09:23:04AM

63 posts

Simon Tebbenham:
Don't forget of course... Lapsus mamillis infectum

Youse guys.

Roy Hunter
@roy-hunter

09/15/17 10:32:06AM

1,718 posts

This post reminds me of meeting Henriette Klauser, PhD, the author of WRITING ON BOTH SIDES OF THE BRAIN (1987). Combined with my hypnotherapy training and self-hypnosis, the concept of using both sides of the brain has helped me with writing my books.

Before writing a chapter or chapter section, I choose the objective or message for said chapter, and then enter a light state of hypnosis before writing...and then start typing on my keyboard WITHOUT editing typos or grammar errors until finishing either the chapter section or entire chapter. After a short break, then I go back and edit for grammar, typos, etc.

This has worked for me for all the titles published with my name as author.

PS: Thank you, Dr. Klauser, for the amazing tips!

Brian Green
@brian-green

09/16/17 08:55:21PM

24 posts

"To be honest, I am actually surprised no one else has experienced this."

We all try to "normalize" our individual experience by extrapolating it as a projection onto everyone, or a group such as "men" or "women" I often have to deal with this with clients who do it with some personal idiosyncrasy of inner or outer experience. Originating perhaps out of our desire not to be different from others, to be acceptable, to fit in?  Best, Brian, aka hypnohotshot 

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