New Induction (Floating Candle)

Created: 09/10/17 06:57:04PM by graham-old

Last Update: 09/11/17 03:12:38PM by Graham Old
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Graham Old
@graham-old

09/10/17 06:57:04PM

2,252 posts

I've just uploaded a new induction that came out of a recent training event I lead.

You can view it at howtodoinductions here, but I'm also uploading it to HT so no one has to leave the site.

Enjoy and please feel free to share any feedback.


Floating Candle Induction



 


Introduction


The Floating Candle was created as a variation of eye-fixation, for those seeking to use their imagination during the induction.




Transcript


Hypnotist: “What I would like you to do is just imagine a candle, up on the wall. It could be on a shelf, on some kind of old-time candle-holder fixed to the wall, or just floating in mid-air, over there.

“And just let me know when you can see it.”

Client: “I can see it.”

H: “Good. And all I really need you to do…”

[Hypnotist begins to speak more slowly, mainly on the client's exhalations]

H: “Is keep your eyes resting on that candle and noticing whatever you notice.

“And I wonder, is that candle lit?”

C: “Yes, it is.”

H: “And is that flame still, or flickering? What do you see?”

C: “It's flickering, but only slightly. It's mostly kinda still.”

H: “That's what I had guessed. But I'm glad you noticed that as well.

“So, now, let your eyes…

[Waits for the next blink]

H: “That's right… just continue to rest on that candle. You may even find your focus narrowing even more, as you focus on that flame, just over there… and just look at that point.... just keep focusing on that spot, without moving those restful eyes...

“And while you keep looking at that spot, perhaps your eyes wonder around a little bit, but always coming back to it in a gentle easy going comfortable way, you can become aware of the muscles around your eyes.... how they are holding your eyes up.... that's right... and your eyelids... and what they feel like....

“You may [waits for them to blink] blink a bit more frequently [waits for them to blink again] that's right... and your breathing might get deeper, as you relax.

“Now, as your eyes are resting on that flame over there, attracting your focus, your mind wrapped around the idea of that flame on that candle where your eyes are resting now, the eyelids may perhaps become heavy… or your eyes want to close. But I don’t want you to close them just yet.

“Let them remain open.

“And lots of people, as they begin to go into hypnosis, find that their focus becomes increasingly fuzzy... vision getting dim and misty... And as you look at that flame you might see that it begins to waver... or maybe you see it blurring...

[Pause]

“That's it...

“You may not even have noticed what is happening with the rest of your body... your arms and legs getting heavy, just as your eyelids get heavier and heavier. And as you think about how nice it would be to allow your eyes and eyelids to relax... and close those tired eyes…

“I would like you to conceive of that flame as a doorway, a portal if you will to your special place. You know that place... of peace and calm, safety and serenity…

“And as you focus your eyes on that flame and as they become more tired and more heavy and
more restful…

“When you are ready, you can step through that doorway, as you ...close your eyes.

“And closing those eyes means you can relax straight into that special place… And whilst you are there, you may as well take the time to look around. See what you see, hear what you hear and feel what you feel… Notice whatever it is that you notice in that special place… Perhaps colours stand out to you, sounds that you can hear… maybe an idea pops into your head… Take this time to allow your subconscious mind to collect whatever resources it feels it wants to, to bring back with you, to assist you and empower you to be all that you intend to be...”

[Pause]

[Deepen, move to therapy/phenomena, or awaken.]


Dave_I
@dave-i

09/11/17 01:36:36PM

533 posts

Nice induction.

If you will allow a bit of a tangent...it occurred to me that this kind of works like (or maybe in fact, is) a leverage induction. Typically, I think of that as something like catalepsy for some reason, and perhaps I am attributing that to things like the handshake interrupt, ambiguous touch, or pattern interrupts in general where you stop the process. Anyway, being as this a very visual-based induction, I am wondering if this might be particularly useful either in capitalizing on the strength of visual types, or in priming the pump for doing visual phenomena. After all, if you start off having them hallucinate a flickering candle, that is a nice jumping-off point for having them visualize whatever you want them to picture, or NOT picture if going for negative hallucinations.

As a bit of an aside, I suppose you could induce/use catalepsy to elicit more of a focus on the body and tactile sensations as well, or creating/modifying internal dialogue for focusing on that element. However, I notice you also bring in the kinesthetic and auditory to the process later as well, so you do kind of cover all the based despite the move visual-heavy nature of the induction overall.

Short version, I like it. Especially the permissive nature that invites them to add motion, and the different senses. Thanks for sharing.

Simon Tebbenham
@simon-tebbenham

09/11/17 02:06:11PM

391 posts

I like it too.

Things that hit me (taking your idea and imagining myself getting creative with it):

1: Client to hold the candle (extra catalepsy - and a little bit spiritual, some people may join the the neural dots to weird and spooky phenomena already held in their memory banks - I sort of picture Derren Brown doing something like this in a dark spook room!)
2: see, hear, feel bit - since I saw Overdurf having a go at that phrase, I tend to want to avoid it now - so more interaction possibilities with feedback. Also, I'd wager for many, olfactory counts too with a candle for an extra sensory dimension
3: I really liked the 'You may not have noticed bit' - defo gonna use that in all sorts of inductions from now, I like that, it's cheeky. Sometimes I get stale and too focussed/repeaty - nice switch

Thanks for sharing. 

 

Dave_I
@dave-i

09/11/17 02:35:01PM

533 posts

Nice thoughts, Simon. A few thoughts...

First, having them hold the candle for extra catalepsy sounds like a variant worth
Simon Tebbenham:2: see, hear, feel bit - since I saw Overdurf having a go at that phrase, I tend to want to avoid it now - so more interaction possibilities with feedback.


I think you may be referring to this video. Either way, I love this so what the hell!
John Overdurf on the difference between NLP and Hypnosis in revivification

I think of the See/Hear/Feel bit as an outline, while the actual vocalization is the experience. But yes, making it interactive, and noticing what you see, where it is, the colors, making it vivid, the sounds, where they are coming from, the volume, tone, what you feel, where you feel it, where it moves to or it you can enhance it, make it more real, etc., etc. Not to mention eliciting and using their own words and experience. The difference to me between those two is pretty profound, and I find it is a great way to not just tell them, but to experience it right along with them.

I also love the olfactory dimension. Candles and matches have a certain powerful scent-association to me, very positive, and that would tie together nicely to me.

And yes, the "You may not have noticed" bit has some nice presupposition going on. It seems clever and inviting.

Graham Old
@graham-old

09/11/17 03:04:12PM

2,252 posts

Dave_I:
Nice induction.If you will allow a bit of a tangent...it occurred to me that this kind of works like (or maybe in fact, is) a leverage induction.

I think that is exactly right, Dave.
Dave_I:Anyway, being as this a very visual-based induction, I am wondering if this might be particularly useful either in capitalizing on the strength of visual types, or in priming the pump for doing visual phenomena.

In this case - and this is a transcript of an actual induction, rather than a script - I had already decided to do an eye-fixation. Then in the few minutes before I got started, it became obvious that the client was very visual. As you see, they achieved a visual hallucination in seconds. My takeaway from that is how many more people could do that given the chance?
Dave_I:Short version, I like it. Especially the permissive nature that invites them to add motion, and the different senses. Thanks for sharing.

Cheers. It is always important to me to go with whatever the client brings. And the imagery involved her seemed to provide plenty of opportunities.
 

Graham Old
@graham-old

09/11/17 03:08:31PM

2,252 posts

Simon Tebbenham:
1: Client to hold the candle (extra catalepsy - and a little bit spiritual, some people may join the the neural dots to weird and spooky phenomena already held in their memory banks - I sort of picture Derren Brown doing something like this in a dark spook room!)

Very nice, Simon. Given the speed with which hallucination is achieved, I don't doubt that this would be effective.
Simon Tebbenham:2: see, hear, feel bit - since I saw Overdurf having a go at that phrase, I tend to want to avoid it now - so more interaction possibilities with feedback. Also, I'd wager for many, olfactory counts too with a candle for an extra sensory dimension

I'll check out Overdurf. Unfortunately, it has become something of a bad habit for me. Evenso, when it works, it is great terminology. Yet, when it is used 'on' someone who has heard it before, it just sounds awful.
I agree on the other interactive possibilities. However, this was initially an impromptu induction and I was caught off-guard by how quickly the client was responding.
Re: olfactory - excellent! With candles that is just spot-on. Cheers.
Simon Tebbenham:3: I really liked the 'You may not have noticed bit' - defo gonna use that in all sorts of inductions from now, I like that, it's cheeky. Sometimes I get stale and too focussed/repeaty - nice switch Thanks for sharing.   

Cheers - and you're welcome.
 

Graham Old
@graham-old

09/11/17 03:12:38PM

2,252 posts

Dave_I:
I think of the See/Hear/Feel bit as an outline, while the actual vocalization is the experience. But yes, making it interactive, and noticing what you see, where it is, the colors, making it vivid, the sounds, where they are coming from, the volume, tone, what you feel, where you feel it, where it moves to or it you can enhance it, make it more real, etc., etc. Not to mention eliciting and using their own words and experience. The difference to me between those two is pretty profound, and I find it is a great way to not just tell them, but to experience it right along with them.

Most of the time, I use something like, "Just notice whatever you notice..." and then provide some possible examples. Given timing issues, I might ask them to tell me what they are noticing. Otherwise, I like to keep it fairly open-ended.
Dave_I: It seems clever and inviting.

Well, that's my nickname! ;)
 

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