Anxiety Treatment for Drug or Alcohol Abuse Patients

Created: 07/23/17 01:09:42PM by daniel-oromaner-mba-ccht

Last Update: 09/15/17 12:21:44PM by Daniel Oromaner, MBA, CCHt
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H.Y.P.N.O.S.I.S.
@hypnosis

08/15/17 07:34:28AM

1,011 posts

This one line speaks volumes and is worth repeating.

I am really tired of "experts" with terrible track records and faulty logic (and lies) dominating the media!

The truth "hurts" for many. Unfortunately, given the "right" circumstances it's often true. "No pain; no gain!"

Michael Bucy, CH
@michael-bucy-ch

09/08/17 03:52:26PM

13 posts

Wow!

 

This underscores, for me, one reason to refrain from the muck of these forums. The title was enticing, but the content left a terrible taste, an uneasy feeling, and depleted too much of my positive energy reservoirs. 

 

Sadly, I think I learned how I used to make others feel with my verbose diatribes. 

 

Eric. Martyn
@eric-martyn

09/09/17 04:45:54PM

4 posts

I personally think addictions start in the imprint/socialisation period, a child/teen see's their parents or other peers drinking, smoking, and unconscious mind logs this as something that in someway benefits them, I have no doubt anxiety can be a contributing factor, and reducing anxiety may well reduce the need for a prop, I personally quit drinking for the sole reason it doesn't benefit me and damages the body, I used a swish pattern and swapped drink for something else the effect was almost immediate, now if I look at a bottle of scotch or beer it repulses me. I have had my share of anxiety and stress since but never been tempted to go back to the old prop.

Scott Hogue
@scott-hogue

09/10/17 06:22:56AM

409 posts

This topic came up for me just about a week ago. I am working with a foundation to promote employee and employer support and we were looking for a treatment center for addiction that did more that drug test you once a month, hit up your insurance card and said good luck.

We found a nice co diagnosis and treatment facility. We met with the principles and they were dedicated to treating and supporting the entire person. They have a one year minimum commitment to the client. They do a full life, psychological and physical workup including life history as well as medical history.

When co diagnosis was mentioned they agreed that many underlying problems present themselves through addiction and treating the addiction by simply removing the substances was not effective in the long run and often counter productive to establishing a healthy life and lifestyle. Sort of the dry drunk syndrome.

We are going with them in our program. They are the only co diagnosis and treatment center in the area.

They have an in house treatment with horses, including riding but also caring for the horses, art, crafts, study with an onsite library, many self improvement and trade courses as well as out patient programs which if you start in house you graduate to.

I think three of the pillars of successful addiction treatment are the removing the client  from their current environment and providing support in the way of substituting, not simply removing things and of course treating any underlying conditions.

I see pain patients that become addicted and go through a herd them through addiction program and come out without the addiction as such, but still in physical pain with no resources. Often angry over the process and who can blame them?

Scott Hogue CChH

Daniel Oromaner, MBA, CCHt
@daniel-oromaner-mba-ccht

09/15/17 12:06:22PM

46 posts

Eric. Martyn:
I personally think addictions start in the imprint/socialisation period, a child/teen see's their parents or other peers drinking, smoking, and unconscious mind logs this as something that in someway benefits them, I have no doubt anxiety can be a contributing factor, and reducing anxiety may well reduce the need for a prop, I personally quit drinking for the sole reason it doesn't benefit me and damages the body, I used a swish pattern and swapped drink for something else the effect was almost immediate, now if I look at a bottle of scotch or beer it repulses me. I have had my share of anxiety and stress since but never been tempted to go back to the old prop.

Hi Eric,
I believe you are somewhat correct about the childhood imprinting. Yet, I don't believe that is the most significant factor. In America, most people smoked in the 1950's. Many, including me, saw their parents smoke. Yet, I nor my brother ever picked up a cigarette. And, in recent years less than 20% of Americans smoke. I just don't believe we would have had that level of stop smoking success if the key factors were childhood role models. In every generation smoking would grow and grow. More children would see parents smoking and then their children would see them smoke and mimic them.

What you have described in your personal experience is EXACTLY what I found happens in short-term aversion therapy! I use the analogy of a stream. You can dam it up, but the water will find a way to keep flowing. You have stopped your use of alcohol, but since the CAUSE was never addressed, your anxiety continues and probably is evident in other aspects of your life. For example, I have had clients who stopped smoking in one hypnosis session (with someone else) who never had a weight problem before and for the next few decades then had a weight problem!

I suggest you find a hypnotherapist who will over time discover and address the cause of your anxiety and help you heal it. In my experience, the benefits can begin very quickly, but I always recommend repeated (each different) sessions to provide a permanent solution. In most people, anxiety/insomnia are not difficult to heal, if the hypnotherapy is done properly.

Daniel Oromaner
Inner Power Hypnosis & Coaching
Tempe Arizona

Daniel Oromaner, MBA, CCHt
@daniel-oromaner-mba-ccht

09/15/17 12:21:43PM

46 posts

Hi Scott,

I think it is a good thing when hypnotherapists get involved in addiction services. Multi-disciplinary approaches are fine! However, I believe hypnosis needs to be a key component. Without it, we have the terrible track record of most rehab facilities worldwide (10% success rate). Yet, I am concerned about this paragraph from your post:

I think three of the pillars of successful addiction treatment are the removing the client  from their current environment and providing support in the way of substituting, not simply removing things and of course treating any underlying conditions.

IF the root cause is discovered and healed, and as I said, it is most often anxiety, the "current environment" and "substituting" are less important. I do note that you added "treating any underlying conditions," but was that an afterthought? You might be interested to know that after treating their anxiety (usually) I have had smokers continue with their friends who all smoked, drinkers continue going to bars and daily marijuana smokers continue with their pothead friends! They never "relapsed!" When the healing is done fully and properly, they are not tempted. And, over time, they will probably find new friends of their own volition.

It is true that I have not worked with those who were injecting heroin, and probably going back to a heroin den wouldn't be a good idea, but I found the most important thing in terms of permanently ending destructive habits/addictions is the work in the subconscious mind. Eliminate the cause and you eliminate the problem.

Daniel Oromaner
Inner Power Hypnosis & Coaching
Tempe, Arizona

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