Anxiety Treatment for Drug or Alcohol Abuse Patients

Created: 07/23/17 01:09:42PM by daniel-oromaner-mba-ccht

Last Update: 09/15/17 12:21:44PM by Daniel Oromaner, MBA, CCHt
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Daniel Oromaner, MBA, CCHt
@daniel-oromaner-mba-ccht

07/26/17 10:20:14AM

46 posts

Roy,

I am sure you are correct that more people used to comment on these discussions, but how do you know the reason? Has there been any research conducted? If disagreements, and yes insults, were the reason, then why is Facebook so ridiculously popular--even in the current political climate in America? Why are "news" programs that specialize in attacks and derision so popular?

I have been one of the supporters of this site since nearly the beginning. I am going to the Conference in Las Vegas, and that seems to be a successful enterprise. As such, I thought it would be possible that the discussion board was also popular and successful. Therefore, I have been checking it out lately. I am not addressing you or the others on this thread, but I have found the quality of some posters to be very uneven. Unfortunately, that is a reflection of those doing hypnotherapy around the country and around the world. In the past, I attended--and did one presentation at--the American Council of Hypnotist Examiners national conference. I found many interesting/talented people, both in the speakers and attendees. Of course, the requirements to be certified by that organization are pretty strict, so it probably doesn't reflect the quality of hypnotherapists around the USA, or the world.

I don't think we do anyone a service by coddling someone in our field who has no idea what they are talking about, yet professionally provide hypnosis services. Again, I am not referring to anyone on this thread. For example, I have someone in my market who has decades of experience who openly believes he can cure pretty much anything we work on in ONE SESSION! I discovered this because one of his weight loss clients ended up at my office after she said he refused to do a follow-up session! From what she described, her first session sounded fine, but his one-session concept is ridiculous! If he could accomplish anything near what he claims, the line for his services would be around the block!

After ten years in practice, and additional years providing psychotherapy services, I have concluded that requiring anyone in the USA who is certified in this work to have at least a bachelor's degree with a major in psychology is a great idea. I'm guessing that would eliminate a small number of talented hypnotherapists. However, it would also eliminate thousands who I think should not be doing this work. If that makes me elitist, so be it.

Daniel

Inner Power Hyposis

H.Y.P.N.O.S.I.S.
@hypnosis

07/26/17 01:17:31PM

1,011 posts

Daniel Oromaner, MBA, CCHt:
disappointed that no one (so far) has chosen to address the young man I used in my initial example who completely stopped smoking marijuana after just a few sessions--none of which even touched directly on the drug use!...please share...your method. 

What fully resolves any "undesired" behaviorBy getting to the root issue (one of several major steps in the "healing of self event" - using regression hypnosis as a key component), there soon will no longer remain any presenting issue ("primary cause") or related concern ("secondary gain") to be dealt with. 
 

Roy Hunter
@roy-hunter

07/26/17 09:56:39PM

1,718 posts

Hello Daniel,

I will give only a brief reply here, but feel free to talk to me at length at HTLive next month if you wish. First of all, I have lost track of the number of clients I've seen over the years who went to someone who promised results in one session...so I totally agree with you on that point. However, I do not believe that a college degree in psychotherapy is necessary IF (note ALL CAPS on IF) the person received in-depth training in client centered hypnotherapy. My original training lasted over many months under the late Charles Tebbetts, and more than one psychologist has told me that my hypnotherapy texts are among the best written...yet I entered this profession without a counseling degree.

As far as my comment about why some people no longer comment here, it is because several people have told me personally either by email or in person that they are tired of being criticized for expressing their opinions. I identify with them, because I was hotly criticized both here and on Facebook in 2016 for teaching and practicing regression therapy. Then when one of the moderators deleted my reference to the regression book that I co-authored with a clinical psychologist, I personally came very close to permanently leaving this website. Other than that, I am not aware of any research conducted.

Graham Old
@graham-old

07/27/17 12:58:28AM

2,251 posts

Hi Daniel,

Apologies for not addressing your examples directly.

It is very common in the way that I work to see generative change. I love it when a client comes in and says, "Not only have I stopped doing A, but I've also started doing B." I praise the client and give them all the credit. They give me all the credit. And everyone's happy!

Regarding your specific example of weed, I think that the only examples I have are people who wanted to keep smoking weed, but stop tobacco, or vice-versa. Of course, they end up quitting both.

I had someone come to see me for what he called Anger Management. He just happened to quit coke after 2 sessions.

Oh, talking of coke, someone came to see me to quit the other kind of coke (cola) and she stopped drinking a bottle of red wine a night. Both were stopped in the 1 session.

I like to work specifically, holistically and generatively. They probably cancel each other out, but it works for me!  :)

Barry Neale
@barry-neale

07/27/17 04:27:16AM

3,187 posts

Hi Daniel,

Just to address one point that you seemed to want to ridicule.

"A sense of significant human connection?" I am really trying to control myself here gentlemen, and abide by the rules of this site. However, as much as I try, I cannot fit my educational or professional experience into that paradigm."

You might want to expand your knowledge and read this article from Psychology Today.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/love-and-sex-in-the-digital-age/201509/the-opposite-addiction-is-connection

 

 

H.Y.P.N.O.S.I.S.
@hypnosis

07/27/17 11:33:52AM

1,011 posts

Barry Neale:
(From)...Psychology Today.    

“Certainly the experience of pleasure does play some role, because it opens the doorway to addiction. But it is clear, based on the fact that most people do not become addicts, that over time a person’s initial experience of pleasure is not what causes that individual to return to an addictive substance again and again, compulsively and to his or her detriment.”
Agreed, pleasure appears to be an enticement (a secondary gain).
“The rats ignored the heroin. They were much more interested in typical communal rat activities such as playing, fighting, eating, and mating. Essentially, with a little bit of social stimulation and connection, addiction disappeared. Heck, even rats who’d previously been isolated and sucking on the heroin water left it alone once they were introduced to the rat park.”

Agreed, social activities (a primary gain) appear to be more fulfilling than the enticement.

However, my final conclusion differs in the sense that: The key that unlocks the door to happiness here reveals that belonging in a community and being socially involved with enticing "healthy" activities trumps "unhealthy" ones.

 

 

 



 

Daniel Oromaner, MBA, CCHt
@daniel-oromaner-mba-ccht

07/31/17 06:27:26PM

46 posts

Roy Hunter:
Hello Daniel, I will give only a brief reply here, but feel free to talk to me at length at HTLive next month if you wish. First of all, I have lost track of the number of clients I've seen over the years who went to someone who promised results in one session...so I totally agree with you on that point. However, I do not believe that a college degree in psychotherapy is necessary IF (note ALL CAPS on IF) the person received in-depth training in client centered hypnotherapy. My original training lasted over many months under the late Charles Tebbetts, and more than one psychologist has told me that my hypnotherapy texts are among the best written...yet I entered this profession without a counseling degree. As far as my comment about why some people no longer comment here, it is because several people have told me personally either by email or in person that they are tired of being criticized for expressing their opinions. I identify with them, because I was hotly criticized both here and on Facebook in 2016 for teaching and practicing regression therapy. Then when one of the moderators deleted my reference to the regression book that I co-authored with a clinical psychologist, I personally came very close to permanently leaving this website. Other than that, I am not aware of any research conducted.

Hi Roy,
I appreciate your reply. I don't know my schedule at HTLive, but would be happy to meet you and chat. At this point, I am going knowing no one (that I know of anyway). That doesn't concern me very much, we all presumably will have experiences in common.

I appreciate that some will not agree with my suggestion about BA's in psychology from an accredited university. It is a thought experiment as that would either have to be done by the certifying organizations or the states. I realize that some degrees are not very worthwhile, and probably if I saw the current curriculum I might be aghast. I have taught a few psych 101 classes decades ago, I just think it is a worthwhile conversation for us to have in this profession. Some of our hypnotherapy competitors ARE scary, and that potentially sullies all of us!

I have no doubt that you have heard from some who chose no longer to participate in this forum because of criticism. I just still find it hard to believe that is the reason for the (relatively) minimal participation. Perhaps if they divided responders into groups of seasoned professionals versus newbies in separate groups? I have zero interest in debating with someone who "has an interest" in hypnotherapy. And, I assume such people can still join. There are many wonderful training academies around the country and world. Those are the places to learn--in my opinion. THIS venue I think would be best served by being limited to full-time practitioners. IMHO

However, this IS social media! My God, if someone in this profession can't stand some criticism or disagreements, I would suggest they may be in the wrong line of work! They might be better off in nursing. No one disagrees in nursing, right? lol

In any case, thanks for responding and presenting your point of view. I spent a few years in marketing research, and know that a few anecdotal experiences can be illustrative, but it is unsafe to assume that all agree with those individuals.

Daniel
Inner Power Hypnosis & Coaching

Daniel Oromaner, MBA, CCHt
@daniel-oromaner-mba-ccht

07/31/17 06:33:47PM

46 posts

Graham Old:
Hi Daniel, Apologies for not addressing your examples directly. It is very common in the way that I work to see generative change. I love it when a client comes in and says, "Not only have I stopped doing A, but I've also started doing B." I praise the client and give them all the credit. They give me all the credit. And everyone's happy! Regarding your specific example of weed, I think that the only examples I have are people who wanted to keep smoking weed, but stop tobacco, or vice-versa. Of course, they end up quitting both. I had someone come to see me for what he called Anger Management. He just happened to quit coke after 2 sessions. Oh, talking of coke, someone came to see me to quit the other kind of coke (cola) and she stopped drinking a bottle of red wine a night. Both were stopped in the 1 session. I like to work specifically, holistically and generatively. They probably cancel each other out, but it works for me!  :)

Graham,

Thanks for responding. I am very happy to hear someone else is experiencing relatively rapid results! Are you using some sort of aversion therapy? I know many people in my market tend to do stop smoking in one session (sometimes a group), but it only seems to "work" for around 70%. I hardly ever do aversion work, but have found some clients for other services who had success for years or decades that way! My stop smoking program is 3-5 sessions, but not surprisingly I like to also work on the underlying need/cause.

Daniel

Inner Power Hypnosis & Coaching

Graham Old
@graham-old

08/01/17 04:03:16AM

2,251 posts

No, I dont use aversion. Well? Maybe one or two throw away sentences which function that way indirectly. 

I work in a solution-focused manner and do a lot of values and acceptance work, with elements of motivational interviewing. 

updated by @graham-old: 08/01/17 04:08:53AM

Daniel Oromaner, MBA, CCHt
@daniel-oromaner-mba-ccht

08/02/17 10:57:48AM

46 posts

H.Y.P.N.O.S.I.S.:
(Snip) What fully resolves any "undesired" behavior? By getting to the root issue (one of several major steps in the "healing of self event" - using regression hypnosis as a key component), there soon will no longer remain any presenting issue ("primary cause") or related concern ("secondary gain") to be dealt with. Mastering this method, albeit somewhat time consuming and advanced, is what I recommend to all professional hypnotists.

I apologize for not responding to this post. Last week I was just clicking links on email updates I received and somehow it was overlooked. I am being more thorough now! I am on board with your quest for the "root issue" and have used regression hypnosis with good results. I also agree that this method is best used by those at an advanced level of training or experience. I DON'T believe that we can place "false memories" and if anyone wishes to explore that subject, I am more than willing to discuss it. However, it is possible to either be ineffective or even possibly make the situation worse if this process is done incorrectly.

I tend to use regression more often with my trauma work--physical or sexual abuse, or experiencing a life-threatening situation. However, I probably use it also in a lighter way to uncover and reprogram associations of love/reward and food. Too many parents, to this day, reward their children with food treats, without any knowledge of the problems this sets up for that child as he/she grows up! I believe that food, particularly fattening foods, should never be used as a reward for good behavior in children.

I have also often found there is a secondary benefit to presenting issues like drug/alcohol abuse or obesity. My initial anxiety mention was made because I have so often heard patients report that their substance abuse increased when they realized it helped them sleep! Their insomnia was anxiety based, and this "self-medication" became a practical coping mechanism! Similarly, the connection between those who have been sexually abused in childhood (primarily girls) and obesity is clear. The subconscious/inner child, discovers that as the weight comes on, the looks and advances of (scary) men decrease! I do not believe this is a conscious process, but again a coping mechanism. And, in our society, for the most part it works! I have worked with many women with weight problems who when questioned had to agree that men are less interested in them at heavier weights and they get fewer sexual advances.

Actually, as I often say in my office, "Everything makes sense when we understand the variables."

Daniel

Inner Power Hypnosis & Coaching

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