What Would You Do If Someone Plagiarized Your Work?

Created: 08/19/17 09:13:43AM by barry-neale

Last Update: 09/08/17 02:50:05AM by Simon Tebbenham
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Barry Neale
@barry-neale

09/04/17 12:14:36AM

3,189 posts

init:
I think there might be some more specific context here. No one is going to steal the work of another and present it as her own. Maybe she has mixed her own work with what she learned in her course and packaged that. Plagerism is bad but hearsay slander and glitch hunts can be cruel!  

All I can say to you init is you weren't there. The context has been given and if you knew this person you would know that they have a history in doing this...... and worse.
I would add that the original training that she attended is just a small training which was video'd so that every comment, question etc was recorded and that much of the correspondence was via email and this was kept so there is an accurate account of everything that happened.
I have been ripped off previously and yes people do steal the work of another and present it as their own.
Another example of ripping something off is the guy who came up with "Faster" EFT. Now admittedly he cobbled together so different tapping points and added anchoring but the guy blatantly ripped off the established name of EFT so that he could instantly compare himself to an established brand and then by using the word "faster" claim that his process was somehow better (which it isn't). Can you imagine doing that in any other field and seeing how far you get. Imagine starting a burger chain called "Tastier McDonalds" or "Faster Fords" . Lawyers would be jumping all over you.
 
 
 

updated by @barry-neale: 09/04/17 12:32:20AM

Don G.
@don-g

09/04/17 05:29:34AM

1,528 posts

I just learned that you can copyright your books and media too by registering them FREE for publication with Amazon. A friend from France has written a book on hyperempiria  and sent me a copy. Nobody is going to be able to steal HIS materiial..

I woukd like to respectfully suggest that anyone who would like to ensure that their intellectual propertyl does not get stolen might want to look into this free and foplproof method of protecting it.. 

BTW, the royalties can be as much as 70% of the purchase price, since it is solely print-on-demand. The most I ever got from a standard publisher was 15% -- if I was lucky!

I'd be interested to learn what others think of this method,

Don

 

updated by @don-g: 09/04/17 06:04:09AM

Fable Goodman
@fable-goodman

09/04/17 07:15:59AM

3,692 posts

Barry Neale:
Another example of ripping something off is the guy who came up with "Faster" EFT. Now admittedly he cobbled together some different tapping points and added anchoring but the guy blatantly ripped off the established name of EFT so that he could instantly compare himself to an established brand and then by using the word "faster" claim that his process was somehow better (which it isn't). Can you imagine doing that in any other field and seeing how far you get. Imagine starting a burger chain called "Tastier McDonalds" or "Faster Fords" . Lawyers would be jumping all over you.      

 
This is a good example, which probably illustrates the (sometimes fine) line  between Plagiarism, and developing/ marketing something which comes out of someone else's previous work, but is significantly different enough to warrant a different name.    
As I understand it, the developer of EFT, fully acknowledges his training in Thought Field Therapy, and how that laid the foundation for what became EFT.   He also had the good grace to give it a completely different name, which allowed it to stand on it's own merits, and not just piggy back off it's predecessor's name.  This is a little different from just making a few cosmetic changes and hijacking an established brand name.  
 

Graham Old
@graham-old

09/04/17 08:50:17AM

2,252 posts

Im not sure we can say he chose a completely different name. From TFT to EFT is not a great leap.

Fable Goodman
@fable-goodman

09/04/17 09:06:34AM

3,692 posts

Graham Old:
Im not sure we can say he chose a completely different name. From TFT to EFT is not a great leap.

I see that is true when you look at the abrieviation (acronym?).
But Thought Field Therapy does not sound like the same thing as Emotional Freedom Technique, any more than it sounds like Touch For Health TFH.  (Which some people might argue is a predecessor of both.)
I don't know if that was an intentional similarity, or just a coincidence.  I have clearly not researched the history sufficiently.   Do you know something that I don't about this Graham?  or are you just noting the similarity?
 

updated by @fable-goodman: 09/04/17 09:08:38AM

Simon Tebbenham
@simon-tebbenham

09/04/17 09:12:53AM

391 posts

I'm no expert but I believe, despite obvious similarities, the point where the line is legally crossed is where someone can prove that the copy cat is deliberately out to mislead that their copy is actually the real deal and fool an unknowing audience. This is probably why copy cat products in other industries have toed the line successfully for so long.

 

Graham Old
@graham-old

09/07/17 02:59:39PM

2,252 posts

No, I dont know any differently, Fable. It just seems to me that both protocols are primarilly known by their initials. Therefore, the similarity seems intentional to me.

I have a Touch for Health book lying around here somewhere, so I might just invent my own system! 

Simon Tebbenham
@simon-tebbenham

09/08/17 02:50:05AM

391 posts

TFI Friday

 

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